Learn How to Program: PHP

Epicodus graciously releases its curriculum for free through its website learntoprogram.com. I decided to work through their PHP class and was surprised to find how comprehensive it is – covering PHP, SQL, BDD, OOP, and any number of other acronyms. While this course doesn’t teach absolutely everything you need to become a developer, it will teach you the craft of coding applications with PHP.

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JavaScript: Understanding the Weird Parts

JavaScript: Understanding the Weird Parts is an 85 part (and 11 hour long) video series that takes the viewer from understanding the subtleties of operators to developing a fully functional micro-library. This is the value of this series: in applying it to library/framework development, JavaScript’s quirks never seem trivial. Anthony Alicea highlights the oddities of the language as strengths and teaches developers the tricks they need ot harness the power of the weird parts.

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Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja

Co-written by one of the biggest hitters in the history of the JavaScript community, John Resig of jQuery fame, Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja is a comprehensive look at the little known features of JavaScript as well as best practices when developing cross-browser, legacy-compatible libraries of your own.

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jQuery in Action

The book jQuery in Action is a deep look into the core of jQuery as well as some of the more popular plugins for the ubiquitous JavaScript library. Cowritten by Bear Bibeault (coauthor of Secrets of a JavaScript Ninja with John Resig, founder of jQuery) and Yehuda Katz (cofounder of Ember.js and former member of jQuery’s Core Team).

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JavaScript for PHP Developers

JavaScript for PHP Developers is a concise and unopinionated comparison of the two giants in internet programming languages. Stoyan Stefanov (author of JavaScript Patterns) explains the little known quirks of JavaScript and essentially offers a diff between the two languages in a way that is sure to offer valuable information to anyone who reads it.

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Head First jQuery

While a big fan of Head First JavaScript, Head First jQuery was a big let down. Admittedly a book on jQuery is a challenge – who is the target audience? Seasoned JavaScript developers or people trying to avoid programming at all? – however this book did not overcome that challenge, offering too little to the experienced developer and often too much to the unexperienced.

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Beginner Interfaces

In an effort to sell repackaged, generic goods, audio interface manufacturers often hype features of their products. To new audio engineers the hype can become overwhelming. In an effort to combat information overload, I take a second to answer a question on what interface is right for who and what an interface is for in the first place.

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HTML5: Up and Running

A beautiful and witty read that, while a little outdated, will offer new web developers some insight to the considerations of building a compliant, semantic, and accessible website. It’s written by Mark Pilgrim, equally legendary for his contributions to the web development community as his sudden disappearance from it.

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Approaching a Mix

Some common questions among new audio engineers are “when do I use compression?”, “what settings do I use for EQ?”, or “what should I center and what should I pan?” There’s a common misconception that there’s a formula for good mixing so in response to a question, I’ll jump on my soapbox for a second and try to help out.

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JavaScript: The Good Parts

There’s no way to get through a conversation on JavaScript books without mentioning The Good Parts. Douglas Crockford is a pioneer and his advice shouldn’t taken too lightly. It’s a relatively short and easy read that might not be agreeable to every JS dev, but should be required reading due to its immense impact.

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